Have You Ever Asked the Question, “Which Flour Should I Use?”

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If you have ever asked the question, “Which Flour should I Use?” Trust me you are not alone. Today we are going to focus on Self-Rising Flour, Plain Flour, and Cake Flour.

Why does it matter which flour I use?

I was recently asked this question and immediately thought, “It depends on what I’m making.”

For one recipe it could be all-purpose flour, and another time it could be self-rising or cake flour. But why do I need to use a specific flour for each recipe? This is a simple answer, but worth exploring. Each type of flour is treated differently during the manufacturing process. From the type of wheat used, storage containers, amount of moisture during processing, milling process, and final packaging; each changes the characteristics of the flour. If you didn’t treat each type of flour differently they would not be able to perform their jobs in the recipes you are trying to make.

With many brand-name flours to choose from, it’s easy to become confused. Which flour do I use? Which one is the best? Do I really need 3 different flours?

Unfortunately, when it comes to bread making and cake baking, there is no “best” flour. But we can learn a lot by understanding the differences between them. Let’s take a look at three commonly available flours that bakers need to know about: Self-Rising Flour, Plain Flour, and Cake Flour. Now that being said, after years of baking, I do have my favorites that I will share with you later on in this post.

In this article, we are going to help you learn about each of these types of flour and the best way to use them so that your desserts will be perfect.

Flour is a staple ingredient in my kitchen

 I use at least one type of flour in almost all my cooking and baking. And as with all things, I’m sure I’m not the only one who has ever asked the question, “Which flour do I use?”

Let’s take a look at the three main flours for any baker to have in their kitchen:

  1. Self-Rising Flour: Self-rising Flour is a mixture of flour and leavening agents. In the United States, this type of flour is marketed under the names: Self-Rising Flour, Self-Rising Cake Flour, or All-Purpose Flour. In other countries, it’s called Self-raising Flour or Raising Flour.
  2. Plain Flour: is exactly as the name implies. It is plain and does not contain any leavening agents. It is a good choice for items that you do not want to rise such as roux or batter for fried foods. 
  3. Cake Flour: Cake flour is a soft flour with low protein content, typically 12-15%. It produces tender cakes as a result of its low protein content.

Let’s take a look at what each one is best used for:

  • Self-Rising Flour is best used for: (low protein) products that should be light, like biscuits, pie crust and most cakes.
  • Plain Flour is best used for: (medium protein) products that will be handled during baking like, cakes, cookies, and pie crust. Personally I like plain flour best for my pie crust.
  • Cake Flour: (high protein) for products that should be tender and fine like angel food cake, or sponge cake and pound cake.

Now that you are educated on these three flours, get baking! Let me know what you think. Leave me a comment below, I would love to hear from you!

Happy Baking,

Donna Kennedy👩‍🍳

donna@bakingwithdonna.com

bakingwithdonna.com

Related Posts:

Why I Love My Kitchen-Aide

10 techniques for delicious homemade Pound Cake

Check out The Bakers Shop for the above flours and all of your baking needs!

Published by dkennedy2021

​Welcome to Baking With Donna, a unique blog here for you to explore. Baking With Donna has added such value to my life, and I love having the opportunity to share my passions and thoughts with my loyal readers. Read on, and enjoy.

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